green card seekersUnder the Trump Administration’s new “comprehensive strategy” meant to strengthen the immigration system and work against fraud, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will soon begin in-person interviews with specific immigrants in the U.S. that are currently seeking status as permanent citizens. Starting October 1, the USCIS will begin the first round of interviews, starting with immigrants living in the U.S. on a work visa that are applying for permanent residency and those with relatives who petitioned to permanently join a refugee family member that already lives in the country.
Previously, the immigrants in these categories did not require an in-person interview. Those seeking status through marriages were more often the ones that underwent a green card interview in-person. However, the USCIS has stated this past Monday that it has plans to “incrementally expand” this interviewing process to include other benefit types as well.
The interviews are meant to provide immigration officers the ability to verify important information that is provided in the applications. Additionally, the goal is to give an opportunity to discover new information that could be relevant to the judgement process, along with determining the credibility of the person that is seeking a green card. According to USCIS Director James McCament in a statement, this change is meant to show that the administration is committed to strengthening and upholding the “integrity” of the country’s system for immigration.
“USCIS and our federal partners are working collaboratively to develop more robust screening and vetting procedures for individuals seeking immigration benefits to reside in the United States,” stated Director McCament.
According to the USCIS, the new requirement change is in compliance with executive order 13,780, which is the travel ban signed by the president this past March following the previously-ruled unconstitutional travel ban in January. The first ban had blocked travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries but did not make it through federal court. The second ban did not apply to green card holders or those with valid visas. Additionally, it lessened the list of banned countries from seven to six. It has been challenged in federal court and has reached the U.S. Supreme Court for judgement.
If you or a loved one has concerns over the newly expanding legislation that applies to green card holders and those on visas, contact our team at Reinherz Law today. Our attorneys will talk you through your circumstances and ensure your rights are represented in the changing atmosphere of the immigration process.

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